According to HubSpot, only 23 percent of companies exceed their revenue goals.

When it comes to marketing your B2B company, there’s no better way to reach your income goals and tell how you’re doing than by measuring specific metrics that align with your business goals. If you want to know what’s working and what isn’t in terms of your marketing efforts, consider measuring the metrics many B2B companies are using so that you can adjust your efforts accordingly. From web traffic and sales lead quality to SEO ranking and customer renewal rates, here are the top 10 metrics B2B companies should be measuring in order to be successful with content marketing.

1. SEO Ranking.

As a B2B marketer, it’s important to track all organic traffic so that you can see how many people are coming to your site because of your SEO strategy. You should be measuring organic traffic by landing page to find areas that need improvement. When you compare SEO rankings, you’ll have an idea of which strategies are working the best.

You could use a tracking tool like SEMrush to figure out the amount of keywords your site ranks for on Google. Depending on the nature of your business, you could consider measuring SEO metrics like referral traffic, visits referred by specific search engine terms and phrases, the number of pages with one visit from search engines, and conversion rate by search query phrase/term.

2. Higher Conversion Rates.

Are you tracking lead score and lead channel origination rate? The lead score tells B2B marketers what position in the sales cycle each lead is currently in. The lead channel origination rate tracks which channels get you the most leads so you can increase your efforts and gain even more leads and conversions. You should also pay attention to the effectiveness of your sales and nurture efforts, and understand what makes you successful when interacting with prospects from lead qualification to formal proposal.

Are you tracking lead score and lead channel origination rate? The lead score tells B2B marketers what position in the sales cycle each lead is currently in. The lead channel origination rate tracks which channels get you the most leads so you can increase your efforts and gain even more leads and conversions. You should also pay attention to the effectiveness of your sales and nurture efforts, and understand what makes you successful when interacting with prospects from lead qualification to formal proposal.

3. Engagement.

Are you measuring social engagement like comments, likes, and shares? Since content marketing is such a big deal for B2B companies like yours, it’s important that you’re tracking engagement on social platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram. Tracking how many people are liking, commenting, and sharing your content gives you an idea of how well you’re doing. If you see your follower count consistently increasing, focus on the activities getting you there. Stick with what works. But if you’re not seeing a steady increase in followers, repeat visits, click-throughs, or downloads, it means something isn’t working for you and you need to figure out what it is and fix the problem so you can increase engagement and boost conversions.

4. Sales.

This one’s a no-brainer. In order to get more sales, you have to track what you’re currently doing. How are your company’s sales doing? Figure out the number of sales opportunities you need in order to hit your target or goal. If your content marketing plan doesn’t specify any goals regarding sales, it’s time to change that. You should also know what a typical sales cycle looks like so you can determine how long it’s taking prospects to move from the first contact to a sale and improve the process if necessary.

Not every business is going to have the same sales process.

A typical sales cycle or buyer’s journey looks like this:

Stages of the Buyer's Journey. 1. Awareness: Prospects become aware of your brand at this stage. 2. Interest: At this stage, the prospect is showing signs of interest in your product or service. 3. Consideration: Your prospect is considering your product or service as a solution to their problem. 4. Intent: Your prospect intends to make a purchase from you but needs more information. 5. Purchase: At this stage, your prospect makes their first purchase and officially becomes a customer. 6. Loyalty: Your customers return for repeat purchases.

Choose the stages that fit your business model and goals. And remember, you can always add or remove stages as you please.

5. Subscriber Growth.

How’s your subscriber list looking? If you haven’t been able to grow your subscriber base in a while, it’s time to figure out why. What’s working and what isn’t when it comes to subscribers? How many emails are being opened? And which ones are getting the most opens? If you analyze your open rates, you can learn which strategies are most appropriate for your target audience. If you’re looking to grow your email subscription list, focus on providing some sort of valuable freebies to your audience in the form of free downloads, eBooks, consultations, or product demos.

6. Customer Renewal/Retention Rates.

Customer Renewal/Retention Rates

How often are your customers renewing their service with you or returning to make another purchase? Paying attention to this number can help you increase customer renewals by focusing on areas that need improvement. It’s a lot cheaper to invest in retaining customers than it is to acquire new ones so if you want to stay in business, make sure you’re nurturing the customer relationship beyond the first sale. Are you following up to ask how the customer likes the product or service? Offering assistance with setting it up or using it (if applicable)? If not, you’re missing out on opportunities to keep your current customers happy and get them renewing.

7. Web Traffic.

Taking a look at your current web traffic. Is it increasing or decreasing?  And what time of day are your prospects visiting your website? Take a look at the traffic patterns over the course of weeks, months, and years to see what you could be doing differently to increase traffic. Determine your most popular content and try to figure out what it is about that content that draws readers in. Then, expand on and repurpose that content into different formats.

8. Purchase Intent.

According to TechTarget, purchase intent is the probability that a consumer will buy a product or service. The main goal of analyzing purchase intent is to provide the right message to the right audience at the right time. Doing this can create a better connection between your marketing and sales departments, as well as accelerate deal velocity and improve conversion rates. To do this correctly, you’ll need to find ways to improve your understanding of which variables have the most impact. Using predictive modeling, you can focus on things like past purchases, website engagement, interaction with marketing content, demographics, and event or webinar attendance.

9. Sales Lead Quality.

Sales Lead Quality Photo

B2B marketers should be tracking hot leads that provide a much better indication of lead quality. These leads should have a clear intent to buy and should be ready and willing to do just that. Make sure that your sales leads are quality leads that will actually lead to sales and not low-quality leads that aren’t in the right phase of the buyer’s journey. Otherwise, you’re both wasting your time.

10. Sales Lead Quantity.

Sales lead quantity is just as important as sales lead quality. Are you getting enough quality leads to help you reach your revenue goals? If not, you need to start thinking about ways to get more qualified leads to your sales and marketing departments. Think about how many SLQs you need and how much you’re getting and try to make up the difference to meet your marketing and revenue goals.

If you want to see your revenue increase this year, you’ll need to track the right metrics in order to grow your company. Using the metrics mentioned above, you can start thinking about what metrics are right for your B2B company. While not every metric mentioned will apply to your specific business situation, you can use this list as a starting point to figure out which metrics are right for you.

How helpful was this article?

Let me know in the comments. And feel free to “Like” and “Share” with your network.

Advertisements

About the Author Admin

I'm a freelance writer of 10+ years and editor of 3+ years. I'm a blogger with a BA in English (Mercy College) and an MS in Professional Writing (NYU).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s